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JAPANESE SNACKS WHICH CAN BE BRINGED HOME

Delicious “souvenirs” that can be brought from Japan.
Tell a friend about Japan:
Everyone loves snacks, and it is no secret that there is a huge variety of them when it comes to sweets, potato chips, fruits and much more. Japan is known not only for its delicious food, such as sushi, tempura, ramen, soba, yakitori and okonomiyaki, but also unique snacks that come in various shapes and sizes with interesting and sometimes quite bizarre flavors. People can go crazy about them and continue to order them online, returning to their homeland, even after they have completed their holiday in Japan.

You can stock up on these snacks, if you are a big fan of them, they will also be an excellent souvenir for everyone you love. Therefore, if you decide to buy a tour to Japan, do not forget about the delicious gifts from this amazing country. The good news is that all of these snacks are extremely popular and available for purchase at major airports, such as Tokyo Haneda Airport, Tokyo Narita Airport and Kansai International Airport, so you should have no problems finding them, even if you are looking for them. last minute. If you are worried that your baggage will be overweight, you can purchase them in specialized shops of duty-free after checkpoints at the airport.

1. SHIROI KOIBITO
“Shiroi Koibito” literally means “white lovers”. This tasty delicacy originated in Hokkaido and consists of two crispy pastries with a chocolate cream in between. Shiroi Koibito is available in two versions: white chocolate, which is the original flavor, and traditional milk chocolate, which is sometimes called the “black version” of Shiroi Koibito.

Many people are crazy about this snack because of the special taste of chocolate cream and crispy texture of sugar-flavored cookies. Shiroi Koibito tastes best chilled (but do not put it in the freezer, because the chocolate will freeze). When you eat Shiroi Koibito, you feel the cookies crunch, and the half-melted chocolate cream melts in your mouth.

Shiroi Koibito is available in various sizes, including 12, 24 and 36 pieces per pack, which are more common at airports. Although it is always cheaper to buy them directly from a factory in Hokkaido, a pack of 12 pieces of Shiroi Koibito in a duty-free shop usually costs 700 yen, and a pack of 24 pieces costs 1,400 yen.

For me, Shiroi Koibito ranks first not only because of its taste, but also because of its immense popularity. This snack is sold in other countries, such as Malaysia and Singapore, but it costs twice as much as in Japan. If you chose a tour to Japan in Hokkaido, do not forget to visit Shiroi Koibito Park! You will have the opportunity to see the whole process, how this popular snack is created, and you can buy it there at a lower price!

2. ROYCE ’CHOCOLATE
Royce ’Chocolate, sometimes referred to as Royce Chocolate, ranks second in the ranking after Shiroi Koibito. It is very popular among travelers coming to rest in Japan and has branches even abroad. If you are a chocolate lover, we recommend you try Royce’s chocolate in Japan. It was created in 1983 and since that time has been loved by both local and foreigners. Royce’s products are also manufactured in Hokkaido. The high quality of this chocolate makes it a competitor to top-notch confectionery brands such as Godiva and Lindt.

Royce ’offers a wide range of varied chocolates, such as Nama chocolate, chocolate chips, pure chocolate, chocolate waffles and chocolate bars. Nama chocolate seems to be the most sought-after product of all. Nama pastry is divided into two categories: liquor containing and non-liqueur, and many flavors are available for both categories! Some common tastes in duty-free shops include green tea, champagne and, of course, their original taste. If you’re lucky, you can find flavors like banana, calvados and strawberries. However, they are only available in very limited quantities. If you are lucky to see a limited edition, be sure to take it, because the chance to buy one will soon disappear!

Royce ’Nama pastries will cost around 800 yen per pack containing 20 delicacies. These candies have a very short shelf life – just one month, so make sure that you eat them on time or you have to throw them away, which, of course, will be expensive. They do not look like ordinary chocolates, which can be bought in stores in different countries, because they need to be stored at temperatures below 10 ° C, they can melt within a few hours if they remain unfrozen. If you are going to spend a lot of time on the plane to your destination, you can always purchase an ice pack that costs about 100 yen. Otherwise, the candy can simply turn into a piece of melted chocolate.

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